Deer Collision – Safety Tips and Statistics

Deer Collision – Safety Tips and Statistics

12:12 26 September in Insurance, Personal

There’s no doubt that deer are beautiful and majestic creatures. But sometimes when nature and vehicles meet, trouble begins.

Mating and hunting seasons usually find deer running across busy highways. If drivers fail to stop or unavoidably collide with one of these animals, the accident usually leaves a trail of destruction in its wake.

Deer Collision Statistics

Every year approximately 200 people die in the United States as a result of deer-vehicle collisions. Aside from human fatalities, damage caused by deer related vehicular accidents includes injury to passengers and wildlife, deer fatalities and serious property damage.

It’s estimated that approximately 1.3 million accidents involving one or more deer occurs in America each year leading to over one billion dollars in property damage.

Deer accidents can happen at any time anywhere in the US, but statistics show that if you live in Virginia, Michigan, South Carolina, Mississippi, Minnesota, Wisconsin, South Dakota, Pennsylvania, Iowa, Montana or West Virginia, the odds of being involved in a deer-vehicle collision rise considerably.

Deer Collision Safety Tips

With that said, there are several ways to reduce the risk of being in a deer related motor vehicle accident. Use these simple tips to navigate roads safely during deer mating and hunting seasons:

Pay attention to road signs

Look out for yellow diamonds with an image of a deer and proceed with caution when they come into view. These signs indicate areas with high levels of deer activity.

Always wear your seatbelt

If you do hit a deer, wearing your seatbelt can potentially reduce any injuries sustained.

Use high beams whenever possible

Deer are typically more active during dawn and dusk, so it’s important to be extra careful while driving during these times, especially since these periods are darker than other times of the day. Use high beams whenever possible, being careful not to blind oncoming traffic, in order to see further in front of the vehicle.

Look out for herds

Deer are communal animals, so spotting one usually means there are others nearby. If you see a deer on the highway and manage to avoid it, be cautious as you move ahead because there are likely more of them.

Conclusion

Avoiding deer collisions is as simple as staying alert and practicing safe driving habits. Having quality vehicle insurance also helps tremendously. Call Ihry Insurance today to find out more about your coverage options for deer-vehicle collisions and to get a free quote.